Episode 24: Wonder Woman

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Wonder Woman. Starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright. Directed by Patty Jenkins. Screenplay by Allan Heinberg. Based on “Wonder Woman” by William Moulton Marston. Distributed by Warner Brothers, 2017.

In this very special episode, we turn our analytical talents to a modern myth: Wonder Woman! Need we say more?

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Source Passages

Wonder Woman. Dir. Patty Jenkins. Gal Gadot. Warner Brothers, 2017. Film. http://wonderwomanfilm.com


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting)


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

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We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


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Episode 23: Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 3 (Conclusion)

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We pick up the pace of our analysis and finish off the Homeric Hymn to Apollo in part 3, covering the second, or Pythian, half of the hymn. Here we learn about Apollo’s connection with Delphi and how he establishes power in a way similar to Zeus.

 

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Selected Sources

William J. Broad. The Oracle: Ancient Delphi and the Science Behind its Lost Secrets. Penguin. 2006.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


Episode 22: Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 2

 

Above: As promised in this week’s podcast, here are a few of Alison’s photos from a 2009 visit to the Temple of Apollo at Didyma (just south of Miletus). It is impossible to adequately convey the massive scale of the temple in photographs! The temple is approached by six steps and is surrounded by a forest of massive columns. Column drums as a wide as a person is tall and column flutes are wide enough to fit a human head. Unusually for a Greek temple, the interior is entered through a narrow tunnel. 

This episode we continue with our close analysis of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. We discuss Apollo’s birth story and the festival on Delos in his honour.

We also have some listener mail!

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


Episode 21: Theseus

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Theseus cycle of deeds: centre, Minotaur; around, clockwise from top, Kerkyon, Prokrustes, Skiron, bull, Sinis, sow. Attic red-figured kylix, ca. 440-430 BC. From Vulci. Kodros Painter. Image source: Wiki Commons.

It’s been a wait for episode 21, we know, but we think it will be worth it! This episode is a very special joint project between us here at MythTake and our friends Aven and Mark at The Endless Knot Podcast.

If you’re already subscribing to The Endless Knot (and really, you should be!), you’ll know that our areas of interest often intersect and overlap. We’ve had many conversations with Mark and Aven over the last year, and finally decided to do a joint podcast–with a twist. To get the whole episode, you’ll have to listen to both our podcasts!

As usual, we examine the primary sources for Greek mythology. This episode is all about the Athenian hero Theseus, most famous for the slaying the Minotaur. We take a look at two dithyrambs by Bacchilydes that tell part of the Theseus story. Then, Aven and Mark tackle some of the etymology that comes out of this myth over on their podcast. So, once you’ve listened to our episode, make sure you catch theirs!

Don’t miss the rest of the show at here at The Endless Knot or subscribe via iTunes, GooglePlay or the podcatcher of your choice!

Listen to Episode 21 on PodBean

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Possible source of the labyrinth myth? Minoan palace floor plan. Knossos, Crete. Image source: Wiki Commons.

Source Passages

Bacchylides. “The Coming of Theseus: A Dithyramb”

Bacchylides. “Theseus and the Ring: A Dithyramb”


Translation Sources

Greek Lyric Poetry. Translated by Richmond Lattimore. University of Chicago. 1960.


Further Reading

Jeremy B. Rutter. “Neopalatial Minoa and Its Influence in the Aegean and Eastern mediterranean Worlds.” Brewminate: A Bold Blend of News & Ideas. 8 March 2017.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative)
Joelle Barfoot
Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


20. Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 1

Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII.
Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII. (Wikimedia attribution: Fingalo – Own work. Image renamed from Image:07Delphi Apoll01.jpg)

This week we embark on a multi-episode exploration of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Lines 1-92 lead us up to the birth of this potentially violent god and establish him as a pan-Hellenic deity.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/2v3wx-6891ee?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 1-92.


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Dionysus. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


 

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

Support us on Patreon!

We love creating and sharing myth content with you!

But, it does come at a cost: recording equipment and web hosting fees for episodes and the blog add up quickly.  We want to make sure that we can afford to keep all our past episodes available for you to enjoy at any time.

So, if you enjoy our podcast and blog, please consider supporting us on Patreon.

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Patreon allows you to pledge monthly support, which we will use to defray our web hosting costs. You can pledge anywhere from $1 to $10, and there are special offers for each level of support.

For $1/month, you get a mention on each episode and blog post we produce.

For $5/month, you also get one of Alison’s awesome original linocuts.

And for $10/month, you also get to request an episode topic!

A big thank you to our first supporters! Our friends Aven & Mark at The Endless Knot and Joelle Barfoot have both shared their love for our podcast by pledging monthly support. We appreciate your support!

 

The Heroic Decision. Part I.

Today, we are seldom confronted with situations that force us to make critical decisions. For most of us our decisions are rather mundane and ordinary. They may seem on the surface to be important or even critical but in the larger scheme of things, are they?

In fact, it has been suggested that we can make so many inconsequential decisions during a regular day that we can even suffer from a condition cited as ‘decision fatigue’ (Bartlett 2015); The after effects of all these decisions is reduced mental clarity and poor judgement. The evidence even suggests that decision fatigue can lead to physical fatigue sapping our strength and vitality.

We are seldom required to make critical decisions that affect ourselves, our families, or our community. Our common work –a- day world is not the hyper potentialized mythic realm where anything is possible and accessible (Frye 18).

We make decisions every day, thousands of them in fact and perhaps that’s part of the issue. For the hero, the decision is a powerful and significant act that separates us from them. This introduces us to the concept of the ‘heroic decision’.

The hero can be tricked into accepting a life-threatening quest (the ‘ill-conceived promise’) of they can willingly choose to ‘step into danger’. They have choices, options and agency. For the hero, there is often no space, no gap between aspiration and ability.

The hero of myth and legend is resourceful in the face of adversity and rarely amechanos (a Greek term that means without resource). The hero’s willingness to ‘rush in where angels fear to tread’ seems foolish (Pope, 1709), yet this simple quality provides a tantalizing insight into their personal philosophy and hence the heroic philosophy of the Greeks themselves.

Haresis (choice) showcases for us how the ancients grappled with the power of intention and decision. Through countless mythical examples, it reveals the hidden mechanisms of the heroic psyche, i.e, the hero’s personal philosophy of decision and action in the face of deterministic cosmos.

Heroic decisions are impactful, they are of consequence and although they can at times be ill-considered, they are still made with all the determinism and vigor we have come to recognize in the great heroes of myth and legend.

If I choose to have cold cereal for breakfast instead of bacon and eggs the world will not end. The entire fabric of society, or even the cosmos itself will not be threatened by my mundane decisions.

Now, the same cannot be said of the hero. Their choices have import; their decisions will have repercussion beyond the immediate and the mundane. Their lives, the lives of their families, their communities and yes, even their cosmos, may in fact be effected by their expression of the heroic decision.

A simple example would be the hero king Pelops. His myth tells us that after some time Pelops, being a young man, decided that it was time to get married. This is rational, expected and culturally significant. It is the sort of decision that we could make, have made, or will one day make – depending on your circumstance. But, what separates us from Pelops is what he does next.

Pelops learns of a beautiful princess by the name of Hippodameia. Her beauty is beyond compare and he believes she would make an excellent bride. Again, all very familiar. Then as would be expected Pelops makes inquiries, or perhaps learns from this very same source about Hippodameia’s father a powerful King named Oinomaos. As I’ve stated this is a typical and expected line of inquiry considering the social cultural context that places marriage as a contract between two men.

Then something changes, and we begin to see what will separate Pelops’ heroic decisions from the mundane decisions of common men. Pelops learns that Hippodameia’s father has killed every suitor that has come seeking his daughter’s hand in marriage. He has learned that 13 other men have tried to win the hand of Hippodameia and they have all failed and died. The heads of the would-be suitors now decorate the gates of Oinomaos’ palace. It’s right at this moment that we may witness the mythogenetic manifestation of the heroic decision and glimpse into the psychology of the hero.

What is that decision? Pelops will continue to pursue Hippodameia; he will not abandon his desire in the face of this obstacle, in the face of this danger. His heroic decision will have consequences, yet he is not dissuaded.

The hero is at home with adversity; it’s expressed here and even expected. His heroic worldview will not permit him any alternative. For the hero moves forward. The decision is almost automatic and thus the hero moves into a state of jeopardy, the familiar ‘ethos’ of the heroic. His heroic decision has placed him there, it has transformed him and defined his outlook.

A heroic decision is informed by a hero’s concept of (representative or otherwise) justice – known as dike to the ancient Greeks, and when we hear about the great heroic deeds of myth and legend we are witnessing expressions of justice.

Justice underwrites the heroic decision. Pelops’ heroic decision places him in the position to act as an agent of justice. Oinomaos has committed acts of barbarism and his role as a father who will not release his daughter to marriage sets him against the natural order that would place a wife and husband together. The institution of marriage is one of the strongest social practices, one that stands as a cornerstone of civilization. This impediment cannot be allowed to stand.

Pelops decides and thus the cosmos is made right and justice is visited upon the head of the transgressor. It would be easy to get pollyannaish here and moralize justice and the hero, but let’s not – not yet.

We have problematized the hero and moved into an aspect of the heroic psyche that is often overlooked and understudied. This area has often been passed over for more easily recognized dramatic heroic elements such as the quest, the trial, the token and numerous other facets of the heroic psyche. For me I only wish to add another nuance to these powerful and compelling figures. Heroes will continue to fascinate us and reveal truths. Their alterity is only reinforced by their familiarity. A ubiquity that manifests across all narrative fields.

 

Works Cited

Bartlett, Debbie. “Do You Have Decision Fatigue?” Georgia Nursing 75.3 (2015): 1-14. CINAHL. Web. 8 Feb. 2017.

Frye, Northrop. Anatomy Of Criticism: Four Essays: Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1971.

Pope, Alexander, Emile Audra, and Aubrey L. William. Pastoral Poetry and An Essay on Criticism. London. Methuen Press, 1961.

 

19. Pelops

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Pelops who? Meet this lesser known Greek hero-king who lends his name to the Peloponnese and is connected to the founding of the Olympic games. Was he really chopped up by his father and served to the gods or is something else going on?

(gif via http://kiszkiloszki.tumblr.com)

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/rq643-675af1?from=yiiadmin

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Source Passage

Pindar. Olympian Ode 1.


Translation Sources

Pindar. “Olympian Ode 1.” Greek Lyric: An Anthology in Translation. Trans. Andrew Miller. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1996. 126-131.


News & Shout-Outs

We are now on Patreon! If you like what you hear, please consider supporting us. Our current goal is to offset our increased hosting fees as our little podcast continues to grow.

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Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes , Stitcher, or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.