Episode 28: Antigone

Sébastien Norlin. Antigone donnant la sépulture à Polynice. 1825, Paris, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts.
Sébastien Norlin. Antigone donnant la sépulture à Polynice. 1825, Paris, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts.

This episode is all about Antigone. We discuss a recent local production of Antigone that explores the current cultural significance of the play and chat about a variety of themes. We also have a special free give away for our listeners!

Antigone, Adapted and Directed by Mike Griffin

Literature & History Episode 32 Antigone

History of Ancient Greece Episode 51 Sophocles


Our free gift

Download a PDF copy of our special edition zine! Written by Alison and drawn by Darrin, this one-page synopsis of Antigone is free to download and print.

Download the PDF.

Instructions on folding a zine on YouTube.

What is  zine?  It’s a magazine with a twist! Read more at AGO Art Matters.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting); Greg Beu; Jeff Wright (Trojan War Podcast); and Dan Lizote.


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or @MythtakePodcast.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

Episode 27: A Bard and a Horse

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We’re back with a full-length episode! For episode 27, we crack open our shiny new copy of Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey! After a chat about the challenges of accessing myths through translation, we  take a look at a small episode that makes up a big part of the Trojan War myth. We hope we do this beautiful translation justice!

We also have listener mail from Andrew, who asks us for some reading recommendations. Check out our recommended reading and listening!

Listen now. 

Download this episode (right click and save)

 


Source Passages

Odyssey 8. 482- 520 (Trans. Wilson).


Translation Sources

Homer. Odyssey. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. 1967.

Homer. Odyssey. Trans. Emily Wilson. 2018.


Recommended Listening

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram. The Endless Knot. Episode 50: Translating the Odyssey, with Emily Wilson. Jan. 3, 2018.

Curtis Dozier. Mirror of Antiquity. Episode 1: Translating the Past, with Rachel Kitzinger. Jan. 2, 2018.

Jeff Wright. Trojan War: The Podcast.


Recommended Reading

Bruce Meyer. Heroes: From Heracles to Superman. 2007.

Bruno Snell. The Discovery of the Mind in Greek Philosophy and Literature. 2011.

Christopher Logue. All Day Permanent Red: The First Battle Scenes of Homer’s Iliad Rewritten. 2004.

Joseph Campbell. Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine. 2013.

Joseph Campbell. Hero of a Thousand Faces. 2008.

Terry Eagleton. Literary Theory: An Introduction. 2008.

Walter Ong. Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word. 1982.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting); Greg Beu.


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

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A Note to our Faithful Listeners

Saturnalia

Hi there, listeners!

It’s been far too long since we last talked, so we thought we would drop you a line to let you know what’s up.

It’s been far too long since we have been in your ears. And we miss you very much.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t available to podcast in November due to an unplanned life event. But I am back now, and Darrin and I are both looking forward to resuming our monthly podcast schedule, such as it is!

Our special November episode was to be a crossover episode with one of our favourite podcasts The Endless Knot. We didn’t get it released, but they did! If you would like to hear our conversation with Aven and Mark of the Endless Knot, we hope you will hop over to their show and check it out.

For some seasonal listening, you may want to re-visit our Saturn episode. The Romans celebrated Saturnalia December 17 to 23rd with feasting, gift giving, gambling, and role reversals. In fact, many elements of the celebration were re-cast as the Christian holiday Christmas in the 3rd and 4th centuries.

In the meantime, Darrin and I wish you and the best of the holiday season and we very much look forward to being in your ears again in the new year with new episodes!

Happy holidays!

–Alison

Saturnai
Read about the Roman festival of Saturnalia on Ancient History Etc.

Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting); Greg Beu.


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

Bakkhai

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This episode we discuss the Stratford Festival’s production of Ann Carson’s translation of Euripides’ Bakkhai, which ran at the Tom Patterson Theatre June 16- September 23, 2017. (Image sourced from the production website.)

Warning: This podcast discusses adult themes and theatre scenes of an erotic nature.

Blood. Violence. Passion. Wine. This episode has it all, as we discuss the Stratford Festival production of Bakkhai, a new translation of Euripides’ Bacchae by Ann Carson.

We apologize for a few audio glitches, especially around the eleven minute mark. We thought this episode was worth sharing anyway and hope you enjoy it.

Find out more about the Stratford Festival production of Bakkhai, including photos and a video trailer, on the production’s website.

You can read more about the Twitches & Itches production of Euripides’ Bacchae in January 2017 in the Brock News.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/yrm25-78d66a?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Sources

Bakkhai. Euruipides. Translation by Ann Carson, directed by Jillian Keiley, performances by Mac Fyfe, Lucy Peacock, Gordon Miller, Stratford Festival, 23 September 2017, Tom Patterson Theatre, Stratford, Ontario.

Bacchae. Euripides. Directed by Colin Anthes. Twitches and Itches Theatre, 18 January 2017, First Ontario Performing Arts Centre, St. Catharines, Ontario.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting); Greg Beu.


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

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Episode 25: The Perseids

Sidney_Hall_-_Urania's_Mirror_-_Perseus
Nineteenth century illustration of the constellation “Perseus and Caput Medusæ” by Sidney Hall (1788-1838). Plate 6 in Urania’s Mirror, a set of celestial cards accompanied by A familiar treatise on astronomy … by Jehoshaphat Aspin. London. Astronomical chart showing Perseus holding bloody sword and the severed head of Medusa forming the constellation. 1 print on layered paper board : etching, hand-colored. Source: WikiPedia

What do you see when you look up at the August night sky? If you time it right, you’ll see the Perseid meteor shower. In fact, you can see the whole store of Perseus laid out in the constellations.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/4exfp-71617f?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting); Greg Beu.


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

Episode 24: Wonder Woman

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Wonder Woman. Starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright. Directed by Patty Jenkins. Screenplay by Allan Heinberg. Based on “Wonder Woman” by William Moulton Marston. Distributed by Warner Brothers, 2017.

In this very special episode, we turn our analytical talents to a modern myth: Wonder Woman! Need we say more?

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/4x3xh-6d2243?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Wonder Woman. Dir. Patty Jenkins. Gal Gadot. Warner Brothers, 2017. Film. http://wonderwomanfilm.com


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth; Stargate Pioneer (Better Podcasting)


We want to hear from you!

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along on Facebook at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


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Episode 23: Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 3 (Conclusion)

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We pick up the pace of our analysis and finish off the Homeric Hymn to Apollo in part 3, covering the second, or Pythian, half of the hymn. Here we learn about Apollo’s connection with Delphi and how he establishes power in a way similar to Zeus.

 

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/gf7vw-6bd745?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Selected Sources

William J. Broad. The Oracle: Ancient Delphi and the Science Behind its Lost Secrets. Penguin. 2006.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


Episode 22: Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 2

 

Above: As promised in this week’s podcast, here are a few of Alison’s photos from a 2009 visit to the Temple of Apollo at Didyma (just south of Miletus). It is impossible to adequately convey the massive scale of the temple in photographs! The temple is approached by six steps and is surrounded by a forest of massive columns. Column drums as a wide as a person is tall and column flutes are wide enough to fit a human head. Unusually for a Greek temple, the interior is entered through a narrow tunnel. 

This episode we continue with our close analysis of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. We discuss Apollo’s birth story and the festival on Delos in his honour.

We also have some listener mail!

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/d94w3-6aa18c?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


Episode 21: Theseus

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Theseus cycle of deeds: centre, Minotaur; around, clockwise from top, Kerkyon, Prokrustes, Skiron, bull, Sinis, sow. Attic red-figured kylix, ca. 440-430 BC. From Vulci. Kodros Painter. Image source: Wiki Commons.

It’s been a wait for episode 21, we know, but we think it will be worth it! This episode is a very special joint project between us here at MythTake and our friends Aven and Mark at The Endless Knot Podcast.

If you’re already subscribing to The Endless Knot (and really, you should be!), you’ll know that our areas of interest often intersect and overlap. We’ve had many conversations with Mark and Aven over the last year, and finally decided to do a joint podcast–with a twist. To get the whole episode, you’ll have to listen to both our podcasts!

As usual, we examine the primary sources for Greek mythology. This episode is all about the Athenian hero Theseus, most famous for the slaying the Minotaur. We take a look at two dithyrambs by Bacchilydes that tell part of the Theseus story. Then, Aven and Mark tackle some of the etymology that comes out of this myth over on their podcast. So, once you’ve listened to our episode, make sure you catch theirs!

Don’t miss the rest of the show at here at The Endless Knot or subscribe via iTunes, GooglePlay or the podcatcher of your choice!

Listen to Episode 21 on PodBean

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Possible source of the labyrinth myth? Minoan palace floor plan. Knossos, Crete. Image source: Wiki Commons.

Source Passages

Bacchylides. “The Coming of Theseus: A Dithyramb”

Bacchylides. “Theseus and the Ring: A Dithyramb”


Translation Sources

Greek Lyric Poetry. Translated by Richmond Lattimore. University of Chicago. 1960.


Further Reading

Jeremy B. Rutter. “Neopalatial Minoa and Its Influence in the Aegean and Eastern mediterranean Worlds.” Brewminate: A Bold Blend of News & Ideas. 8 March 2017.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative)
Joelle Barfoot
Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


20. Homeric Hymn to Apollo Part 1

Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII.
Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII. (Wikimedia attribution: Fingalo – Own work. Image renamed from Image:07Delphi Apoll01.jpg)

This week we embark on a multi-episode exploration of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Lines 1-92 lead us up to the birth of this potentially violent god and establish him as a pan-Hellenic deity.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/2v3wx-6891ee?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 1-92.


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Dionysus. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


 

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.