Episode 22: Apollo Part 2

 

Above: As promised in this week’s podcast, here are a few of Alison’s photos from a 2009 visit to the Temple of Apollo at Didyma (just south of Miletus). It is impossible to adequately convey the massive scale of the temple in photographs! The temple is approached by six steps and is surrounded by a forest of massive columns. Column drums as a wide as a person is tall and column flutes are wide enough to fit a human head. Unusually for a Greek temple, the interior is entered through a narrow tunnel. 

This episode we continue with our close analysis of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. We discuss Apollo’s birth story and the festival on Delos in his honour.

We also have some listener mail!

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

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Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


20. Apollo (Part 1)

Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII.
Apollo wearing a laurel or myrtle wreath, a white peplos and a red himation and sandals, seating on a lion-pawed diphros; he holds a kithara in his left hand and pours a libation with his right hand. Facing him, a black bird identified as a pigeon, a jackdaw, a crow (which may allude to his love affair with Coronis) or a raven (a mantic bird). Tondo of an Attic white-ground kylix attributed to the Pistoxenos Painter (or the Berlin Painter, or Onesimos). Diam. 18 cm (7 in.). From a tomb (probably that of a priest) in Delphi. Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Inv. 8140, room XII. (Wikimedia attribution: Fingalo – Own work. Image renamed from Image:07Delphi Apoll01.jpg)

This week we embark on a multi-episode exploration of the Homeric Hymn to Apollo. Lines 1-92 lead us up to the birth of this potentially violent god and establish him as a pan-Hellenic deity.

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Apollo 1-92.


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymn to Dionysus. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.


Patrons

These people like our show so much, they decided to support us on Patreon! Thank you so much!

Aven McMaster & Mark Sundaram (Alliterative); Joelle Barfoot; Erika Dilworth


 

Like what you hear? Please support us on Patreon.

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

19. Pelops

tantalus

Pelops who? Meet this lesser known Greek hero-king who lends his name to the Peloponnese and is connected to the founding of the Olympic games. Was he really chopped up by his father and served to the gods or is something else going on?

(gif via http://kiszkiloszki.tumblr.com)

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Source Passage

Pindar. Olympian Ode 1.


Translation Sources

Pindar. “Olympian Ode 1.” Greek Lyric: An Anthology in Translation. Trans. Andrew Miller. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1996. 126-131.


News & Shout-Outs

We are now on Patreon! If you like what you hear, please consider supporting us. Our current goal is to offset our increased hosting fees as our little podcast continues to grow.

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Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

18. homeric hymn to dionysus

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In our current episode of MythTake we discuss the ‘arrival’ of Dionysus as depicted in the Homeric Hymn #7. The Hymn describes a young, strong and beautiful god who is abducted by pirates for ransom. Long story short, it doesn’t quite work out for the pirates and yet again we see the after effects of a divine encounter.

In the course of a few lines these men and their vessel are transformed, literally in the case of the crewmen, into dolphins; and figuratively – the helmsman will become the prototypical priest of Dionysus. The Captain– well let’s just say that he too becomes transformed. He is consumed, digested by the god. 

These metamorphoses as a result of a divine epiphany are again quite common in the mythical corpus. Hesiod’s encounter with the Muses on the slopes of Mt. Helicon, The Cretan sailors in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo and others. In the presence of divinity humans often find themselves ‘altered’. Their paths through life take a turn, they become something else. Shepherds become poets, sailors become priests, helmsman become baccantes, predators become prey – you get the picture.

As we discussed the passage it became quite evident that there are many mythological elements that this small hymn (of 49 lines) has in common with other sources. These metonymical connections spread out from this hymn (like the ivy covering the ship’s mast) and work their way into Hesiod, Euripides, Ovid, Apollodorus and beyond. [DS]

 

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Source Passage

Homeric Hymn to Dionysus (Hymn 7)

Ovid. Metamorphoses. 3. 845-863.

Apollodorus. Library of Greek Mythology. 3.5.3


Translation Sources

Apollodorus. The Library of Greek Mythology. Translated by Robin Hard. Oxford World’s Classics: 1997.

Homeric Hymn to Dionysus. Translated by Susan C. Shelmerdine. Focus Publishing: 1995.

Ovid. Metamorphoses. Translated by Charles Martin. Norton: 2004.


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Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.


17. Heroes at Home: Deianira

This week we meet an unlikely hero, Deianara. Can this fearful, anxious woman, blamed for the death of Heracles, be considered a hero? We think so!

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Source Passages

Sophocles Trachiniae (Women of Trachis) 1-48, 436-469.


Translation Sources

Sophocles. Women of Trachis. Translated by Michael Jameson. Edited by Greene and Lattimore. Chicago, 1957.


Selected Sources

Edwin Carawan. “Deianira’s Guilt.” Transactions of the American Philological Association 40 (130): 2000, 189-237.


Shout Outs & Notes

Literature and History podcast by Doug Metzger

The History of Ancient Greece podcast by Ryan Stitt

The Story Behind podcast by Emily

The Lonely Pallet podcast by Tamar Avishai

The new @HumCommCasters community! Find new humanities podcasts to listen to and network with fellow humanities podcasters.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum or #MythTake.

We’re a part of the #HumanitiesPodcasts podcasting community. Check out the hashtag and follow @HumCommCasters to find many more engaging and knowledgeable podcasts.

We’re on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

16. heroes at home: helen of troy

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We continue our look at heroes at home with the woman who needs no introduction, the (in)famous Helen of Troy.

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Source Passages

Euripides’ Trojan Women lines 914-965.


Translation Sources

Euripides. Trojan Women. Translated by Diskin Clay. Focus, 2005.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

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Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

15. heroes at home: megara

Join our informal discussion on heroes of the home! Tonight we chat about Megara, the first wife of Heracles, from Euripides’ Heracles.

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Source Passages

Euripides Heracles 275-311, 516-561.


Translation Sources

Euripides. Heracles. Translated by Michael R. Halleran. Focus Classical Library. 1988.


Shout Outs & Notes

Ellie Mackin “Odysseus doesn’t go to the Underworld in the Nekyia, peeps!” Blog post.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

14. Hallowe’en Special: Necromancy in Greek Mythology

img_6482C’est l’Hallowe’en! We have a special spooky episode for you this week: two episodes of necromancy from Greek mythology! Follow the spell-binding details (haha!) of Odysseus’ encounter with the dead and Jason’s summoning of Hekate in Argonautika.

Have a safe and spooktacular Hallowe’en!

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Source Passages

Odyssey 11.13-50

Arognautika 3.1026-1049, 1194-1224


Translation Sources

Apollonios Rhodios. Argonautika. Trans. Peter Green. University of California, 2007.

Homer. Odyssey. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. Harper Perennial Classics, 1967.


Shout Outs & Notes

Listener mail from @EllieMackin–you should follow her!


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

13. mythological tour of the solar system: ceres/demeter

img_6482Our last stop on our mythological tour of the solar system is the dwarf planet Ceres! We take a look at the Greek goddess Demeter, who is anything but insignificant!

(I can’t believe we’ve made it through 13 episodes and you guys are still listening. Thanks!)

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Demeter 90-104, 233-280, 440-495


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymns. Trans. Susan Shelmerdine. Newburyport MA: Focus Publishing, 1995. Print.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Ceres” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/ceres


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

12. mythological tour of the solar system 9: pluto/hades

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Welcome to episode 12! Our apologies for being more than a little late getting the blog post up, but here it is at last.

This episode, we delve into the mysterious world of Hades. This Greek god of the underworld is also associated with wealth and the Roman god Pluto. There aren’t a lot of myths about Hades but we can learn a lot from his appearance in Homeric Hymn to Demeter.

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Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Demeter 1-23; 334-385.


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymns. Trans. Susan Shelmerdine. Newburyport MA: Focus Publishing, 1995. Print.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Pluto: King of the Kuiper Belt” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/pluto


Shout Outs & Notes

We highly recommend listening to The Endless Knot episode on Pluto. Sarah and Mark provide a great discussion of the origin of the god Pluto. You can subscribe to their podcast through iTunes.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

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This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.